File Format Buffet! – choosing your output format

Dec 09
2015

Anymore OCR and data capture solutions give you a broad selection of what output format you want the result to be in?  Until the advent of layered file formats, your only choices were texts such as Word .Doc or Plain Text .txt. But now formats themselves have come with a ton of options, leaving people to make decision first on what export format to use then what variation of that format.

It seems for the most part OCR is exported in one of two primary formats Word .Doc or Portable Document Format .PDF. So we will use these as our staples.

Word is more or less a text only format. Scanning and converting a document to word is useful for when you want to make edits to the text, reformat, add graphics, and then re-create the document, or borrow it’s contents. Some of the options included in this format relation to OCR and Data Capture are to keep formatting, keep graphics, and encoding. It’s fairly easy to decide out of these options, which would be most useful to your process. The text formats from document conversion are usually limited to immediate consumption and not distribution, and the layered formats are for distribution and storage.

There are actually many layered file formats. There are even formats of JPEG and TIFF that permit a text layer. In the last few years, Microsoft released their own “layered” format called XPS, who’s popularity has yet to catch on. PDF is still the winner in this area. PDF comes with a salad bar of options, and sometimes it’s hard to pick what is best. When used in conjunction with data capture and OCR, the most common variation of PDF is a PDF with search-able text under page image. What this means is that the visible layer of the PDF is the scanned image, underneath it with matching coordinates is the text from OCR or Data Capture. The purpose is by searching the text you will find on the image the contents of your search. Because PDF is for the most part a locked down format, it’s important to decide first what variation you want before even creating one. Other common settings are tagging, password protection, PDF/A for archiving, and bookmarks. When used with Data Capture and OCR you will see PDF/A frequently for long term archiving of documents, and password protection. The settings tagging and bookmarks usually require an additional manual step unless the Data Capture program supports filling of this meta data. If you keep the quality of the image layer for any layered format high enough, you can OCR it again if you make a mistake in your format.

The upshot is, though you have a lot of options you should be able to very easily find the best practice or norm for your space. You have a lot of choices but many of them are used only in specially scenarios and if you are not privy to the scenario then you probably don’t need it.

Chris Riley – About

Find much more about document technologies at www.cvisiontech.com.

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